What Determines the Price of Scrap Metal?

What Determines the Price of Scrap Metal?

Selling scrap metal is an easy way for many industrial companies to make money. Construction, food packaging, and automotive industries are just some of the many business types that often have scraps left over after finishing a job. The question is, what determines the price of scrap metal? Discover what factors influence these prices, plus several additional reasons you need to start selling your scrap material.

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Industries That Can Benefit From Recycling Their Scrap Metal

Industries That Can Benefit From Recycling Their Scrap Metal

Recycling is an important factor when it comes to creating a healthy environment. While some businesses reduce their eco-footprint by installing low-energy lighting and other fixtures, many industrial companies recycle scrap metal. Check out this list of industries that can benefit from recycling their scrap metal.

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Why You Should Recycle Scrap Metal From Your Demolition Site

Why You Should Recycle Scrap Metal From Your Demolition Site

One company’s impact on the environment can affect everyone living in the community. So its actions have consequences. For example, teams of workers end up with piles of unneeded materials during demolition that contribute to waste. However, it’s possible to reuse some of this. Investigate why you should recycle scrap metal from your demolition site to keep the planet green.

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Understanding How Auto Salvage Works

Understanding How Auto Salvage Works

Recyclers who are looking to keep metals in circulation will take almost anything. Recyclable metals can be as thin and light as aluminum or as thick and dense as lead. One small piece of metal can be of value, and so can an entire discarded automobile. When a car or light truck has given so much of itself that it’s not even fit to be a high schooler’s first set of wheels anymore, that auto is destined for the salvage yard. Even if that car in its current form won’t be back on the road, its components and materials can find new life in new applications—even as parts of new cars. By understanding how auto salvage works, you can open new revenue streams for your scrap yard by offering a “final resting place” for your market’s exhausted cars that, thanks to the recyclability of their parts, won’t be quite so final after all.

Acquisition

The process begins with getting the car in the yard. Some drivers may be able to drive their car to the yard, but an automobile bound for the salvage yard rather than the used car lot often isn’t in any condition for its owner to drive it there. This necessitates towing on the part of the recycler. Scheduling a pickup is also the ideal time to start establishing the value of the car you’ll be picking up. You may need to take the owner’s word in giving an initial quote, which may turn out to be slightly off base upon first-person inspection.

Preparation

Scrappers hope to “use the whole buffalo” when it comes to recycling an automobile. This means stripping all possible assets from a unit before sending any remaining steel away. Of course, not everything is fit to be reused. Specifically, the various fluids that course through a car need to be drained before continuing with the salvage process. This includes engine coolant, motor oil, antifreeze, transmission fluid, and power steering fluid, as well as any remaining gasoline. While a few of these fluids can themselves be recycled in certain instances, recyclers must still fully remove these chemicals from the parts in which they circulate.

Non-Ferrous Metals

Though steel scrap’s resale value is notoriously low, there are often more lucrative metals in the construction of a car or truck. Be on the lookout for copper, aluminum, and zinc in parts beneath the main body of the car. Finding these non-ferrous metals in generous quantities is often what makes auto salvage worth it for a business.

Automotive Glass

When recycling a car, you’re not only after the steel that makes up the majority of its composition and the other non-ferrous metals in parts. Even auto glass, with additional processing, is recyclable. Modern windshields feature a thin layer of polyvinyl butyral, or PVB, which protects drivers and passengers from windshields shattering into large and deadly shards. Rather, this treated windshield glass crumbles upon high impact, keeping any one piece of the glass from being particularly dangerous. However, in order to return this glass into circulation, a specialist must remove the PVB membrane between the two layers of windshield glass before pulverizing and melting the remaining glass for reuse. You probably won’t find recycled windshield glass in your kitchen cabinet, but you may find it in terrazzo flooring, reflective paints, and fiberglass insulation. Even if your own facility doesn’t have the capability to recycle glass on the premises, you can do business with those who do specialize in breaking down treated glass.

Tires

Though they’re not made of metal, auto salvagers will set tires aside for recycling as well. Tires can be retread and resold or melted down into new tires. Many high school running tracks today do not have asphalt surfaces that maximize joint impact, but rather a composite of granulated and reconstituted tire rubber, whose shock-absorbing properties protect the knees of runners far better than hard pavement does. As artificial grass surfaces make their way to the high school and community ranks, granulated rubber serves as the infill for synthetic grass, taking the place of natural dirt.

Auto Textiles

Also not metallic but of great value in auto salvage is a car’s upholstery. More and more, auto upholstery is becoming a commonly recycled component of a car, with textiles in new models incorporating polyesters that use everything from recycled upholstery itself to post-consumer waste such as recycled plastic bottles. This is one of the more effective ways in which auto manufacturers reduce their carbon footprints and save energy. Outside of the auto industry, the fabrics in car seats find alternative uses in upcycling, where they can be reused in other products such as wallets. Whatever the fate of this upholstery turns out to be, it’s imperative that salvagers remove it all from an automobile in the scrapping process, so as not to let this valuable material go to waste.

Compression and Shredding

Readers and recyclers of a certain age may remember the animated film The Brave Little Toaster, where “condemned” cars are sent to a crusher in a particularly traumatic scene. Fortunately, the cars that salvagers work with generally lack the emotional valence of their animated anthropomorphic counterparts. Just as scrappers bale loose scrap metal into easy-to-ship cubes, so too must they compress what remains of cars after harvesting all other usable parts. A crane magnet generally does the heavy lifting in this sequence. Once all other usable components are absent, the remaining steel that makes up a car is crushed and sent off for shredding. Once shredded into manageable chunks, roughly the size of an adult fist, the steel is smelted and reused—most likely in a new car.

In Summary

Our automobile industry, in Detroit and around the world, would not be sustainable without vigorous efforts to reclaim every possible part of a car or truck. You can increase revenue and global sustainability alike by understanding how auto salvage works and how your recycling facility can play a part in the life cycle of the materials that go into our vehicles. Electromagnets and other products from Moley Magnetics can help you and your staff do the work of putting materials back on the road or out in the world in new forms.

How Auto Salvage Works
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Disposing of Metal on Your Construction Site

Disposing of Metal on Your Construction Site

No builder likes to let materials go to waste. But in the process of cutting, shaping, and working with your materials, you still may find that you have a few leftovers—and that’s not even counting power tools. Leftover scrap metal is heavy, unwieldy, and takes up valuable storage space, and taking what’s left to the dumpster means a total loss when it comes to expenses. Fortunately, with conservation-minded strategies for disposing of metal on your construction site, no material ever truly goes to waste. You may be getting leftover metal off the premises, but rest assured it’ll end up being put to good use—even including those worn-out tools.

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Obsolete vs. Prompt Scrap: The Differences

Obsolete vs. Prompt Scrap: The Differences

Love may make the world go round, but recycling metal is what keeps the manufacturing world turning. Mining is hard and energy-intensive work, so whenever you can reduce the demand for new metal, it’s a boon to the planet and your bottom line. But recycling metal isn’t as simple as filling a bin with old cans once a week. The salvage industry relies not only on disused consumer products but on access to industrial byproducts that may never enter the layman’s mind. Read on to explore obsolete vs. prompt scrap and their differences.

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Ferrous vs. Non-Ferrous Scrap Metals

Ferrous vs. Non-Ferrous Scrap Metals

The scrap metal has seen exponential growth over the course of centuries; in fact, it’s a $29.9 billion industry as of 2020. In addition to the growing industry, there are millions of people the industry employs year over year. Included in those millions of people are CEOs, upper-management, supervisors, and every other employee. Regardless of which employee you are, you must have a solid understanding of the different materials you handle. In the scrap metal industry specifically, you’ll handle a lot of ferrous and non-ferrous materials. Whether you’re a line worker in a scrap metal facility or you own the company, you must understand ferrous vs. non-ferrous scrap metals. If you’d like to learn more about ferrous and non-ferrous metals and how they can affect your scrap metal business, we’ve got you covered; read on to learn more.

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How to Maximize Scrap Metal Profits

Businesses and individuals alike often forget about all the metal they have that they’re not using, which they could scrap for extra money. Whether you’re a scrap metal business, or simply an individual looking to get the most for your metal, you deserve top dollar. Keep reading to learn how to maximize scrap metal profits.

Call the scrapyard beforehand

Though most scrapyards won’t turn away business, sometimes they have to if there’s an influx of people trying to sell their metal, so it’s a good idea to call before you load your vehicle up. You also should call beforehand to get the scrapyard’s prices over the phone. While the price of scrap metal is largely influenced by market and index prices, that doesn’t mean that each scrapyard is following that trend.

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North American Scrap Metal Market Price Movements

North American Scrap Metal Market Price Movements

The North American copper scrap prices held steady on ScrapMonster Price Index  as on June 22nd, Thursday. Aluminum and Steel scrap prices remained unchanged. Stainless Steel scrap, Brass scrap and Bronze scrap prices too recorded no variation over the previous day.

  • The price of Alternator scrap remained unchanged over the previous day.
  • The prices of Scrap Electric Motors, Sealed units, Starters and Xmas Lights maintained previous day price levels.
  • Meantime, prices of 5052 Scrap and 6061 Extrusions remained flat at $0.60 per Lb and $0.58 per Lb respectively.
  • 304 SS Solid prices remained unchanged at $0.47 per Lb over the previous day.
  • 310 SS and 330 SS prices saw no variation in prices on a daily basis.
  • 70/30 Brass Scrap, 80/20 Brass Scrap, 85/15 Brass Scrap and Brass Radiator scrap prices reported no change in prices on June 22, 2017.
  • Brass Radiator /Fe and Brass Radiator Ends prices maintained the previous day price levels.

Read entire article here: http://www.scrapmonster.com/news/north-american-scrap-metal-market-price-movements-22nd-june-2017/1/65304

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About the Scrap Industry

About the Scrap Industry

According to Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries Inc (ISRI), Scrap recycling is an $87 billion industry in the United States that annually transforms more than 130 million metric tons of scrap metal, paper, plastics, glass, electronics, textiles, and rubber from commercials, residences, and industrial sources into useful raw materials that are essential to the manufacture of new products. Last year, the U.S. scrap industry processed 77 million metric tons of ferrous scrap, valued at $26.3 billion, the most recycled material in the U.S. and worldwide. (more…)

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